tomatoes

Market Days Are Here Again

It has been a long wait, but we are happy to report that starting next week, we will be back in our market swing.

I’ll be posting our market schedule below on the website calendar and on Facebook.

Here is a preview of what harvests await:

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Jalapeno

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Cayenne

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Romas

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Lettuces

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Beets

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Zephyr

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Eight ball

Green beans and potatoes are coming to market, too.

Stay tuned for more!

Seed saving – first up tomatoes

 

Fall is in the air, and the summer crops in the garden are starting to wane. It is time to reflect on some of the positives and negatives of the season with an eye toward to future. What this statement means to me is highlighting the things that we liked and making sure they are in mind for next year.

One of the ways to perpetuate successful crops is to save the seeds. Seed saving has always been on my to-do list, but I haven’t taken full advantage of the process. I am trying to reverse things this year.

Seed saving

Seed saving

First seeds to be saved this season are from our tomato crop. Here is how:

  • Ripe fruits from my favorite tomatoes were harvested.
  • Tomatoes were cut and the seeds squeezed out into a clean, labeled glass jar.
  • Water was added.
  • Mix is stirred twice a day.
  • What will happen – the gelatinous coating on the seeds will be removed via fermentation.
  • Good seeds will sink to the bottom, bad seeds will float.

I am following the process described in this beginner’s guide to seed saving from the Rodale Organic Life. This guide also provides seed saving information for peppers, winter squashes, melons, eggplants, cucumbers, and summer squashes.

Do you save your seeds?

This weather is…

Storm after storm

Storm after storm

 

 

 

 

 

 

perfect for….

FUNGUS!

I am a fretter by nature, and I am fretting a wee bit right now. About the weather. About fungus. Specifically, about BLIGHT.

I fret about our beautiful tomatoes. Plants that have been growing gorgeously. Plants laden with green fruits. Plants that are drowning in this current weather pattern.

Cooler than usual days. Nearly 4 inches of rain in the last 7 days; 7.5 inches since July 1st (we average 4.26 inches for the entire month). Cloudy, dreary, damp days.

Perfect conditions for blight. Holding my breath, fingers crossed…I hope to bring some tomatoes to market next week.

How is your tomato crop doing where you are?

Here is come info from Cornell about late blight in tomatoes.

Tomatoes…may be this year?

This past weekend was a garden blitz. One of the things that was planted included this season’s tomatoes…

tomato prep

tomato prep – first time I got stakes in first!

Here is what we are trying out this year…a couple are return varieties…

  • celebrity
  • beef steak
  • taxi (yellow)
  • juliet (roma/sauce)
  • sungold (orange cherry)
  • eva purple ball (heirloom)
  • tropic vfn (blight resistant)
  • glacier (smaller red)
  • sweetie pie (red cherry)
  • volunteer yellow cherry

Fingers crossed!