Farm

May 16, 2016 Market

Greetings Friends.

We kick off our market season tomorrow at Pulaski’s The Marketplace Farmer’s Market.

Asparagus

Come join us there and stock up on fresh harvests of:

  • Asparagus
  • Mixed loose leaf lettuces
  • Spinach
  • Salad Turnips
  • Radishes
  • New potatoes
  • Arugula
  • +/- Tomato plants (Cherokee Purple, Striped German, German Johnson, Yellow Brandywine, Black Cherry, Glacier)

The Marketplace is located in downtown Pulaski at the train depot.  It offers a variety of craft vendors, artisans, meats, produce and more.  You can also grab a bite to eat, enjoy a beverage from places such as West Wind Winery, and listen to some music while you shop.

Please join us and stock up tomorrow.  We will NOT be at the Marketplace next Tuesday due to day job schedule conflicts.

See ya tomorrow!

Leaf Lettuce

Wash out

We’ve had some rain.  Working in the garden was out of the question – boggy, muddy mess.

Blue bird house

We built some blue bird houses.

We watched golf.

We went shopping for kayak paddles.

We waited for the sun.

Is that sun to the West?

I don’t care if it rains!

We needed the rain…but we are glad that the sun has returned!

Crimson clover

Crop Rotations and Plans 2017

Crop planning is one of my favorite seasonal preparations.  It is part day-dreaming about the new and exciting things that will be tried during a season and another part problem-solving.

Problem-solving?

Well, yes…

Things to consider – what to plant, crop rotations, soil needs, and overall spacing (will what I WANT to grow even fit in the garden plan?).

Fall planted mesclun

Fall planted mesclun

Deciding what to plant is always the super fun part.  All those STUNNING seed catalogs that stuff the mailbox in January…glossy, perfect pictures of beautiful produce.  Love it.  But…it is easy to look at all those gorgeous photos and get carried away.  I’m a biologist at heart and am driven to experiment, but I also have to remember to go with what I know people enjoy and with what has proven to work in our setting.

With our raised planting beds, we are able to practice bio-intensive plantings.  That basically means we try to utilize all the space offered in the planting bed to maximize production.

Want a good and informative read?  

Check out Jean-Martin Fortier’s Book “The Market Gardener.”

We also concentrate our soil amendments to the planting area.  No more compost lost to the pathways or beyond the raised bed.  Focusing the application is more efficient and cost effective!

Crop rotations become easier with each season when you start with a master plan.  Flexibility in farming is a must, but having a basic idea from the get-go is needed to guide decisions throughout the seasons.

There is a lot of information out there about crop rotations and strategies.  The bottom line is to not plant the same crop or crop family in the same spot year after year.  Crop rotations give the soil a “break” and interrupts some pest cycles.  The crop rotation plan we try to mirror is Eliot Coleman‘s eight year plan:

8 year rotation plan from Eliot Coleman

8 year rotation plan from Eliot Coleman

So…with Spring around the corner, we are ready.

  1. We have our seeds ordered and seed starting is underway!
    Onion seeds

    Onion seeds

    2. Our crop rotation is set letting us finalize our crop plan.

    3. The garden is mapped for 2017!

And so begins our 2017 market season.  We hope you join us for this year’s market journey!